Tag Archives: wheelbase

Hyundai Verna

kompas
Hyundai Verna
Largest automobile manufacturer in South Korea, Hyundai Motor Company, continues to strengthen its global product in the mini sedan segment. Verna launched its newest principals or Accent to the United States market in the carpet Beijing Auto Show, 26 April -2 May 2010.

From the shape, design look headlights, grille, and LED lights that are similar Sein smaller version of Sonata. In the interior, design and material quality improved.

Verna is using a new platform with 2.57-meter wheelbase was carrying gasoline engine 1.4 L Gamma with multiport injection. Power output reached 106 with a torque of 135 Nm dk. For transmission, there are two options, 5-speed manual that is claimed to consume a liter of fuel for 17.5 km and 4-speed automatic Fuel Economy with features that consume a liter to 16.1 km.

Hyundai also offers a second machine with a capacity of 1.6 L dk-powered 121 and 155 Nm of torque. For this option, light available four-speed automatic transmission.

“Today is very special for us. Not only will there is a new product, but this became the first launching a rarely performed outside the South Korean Hyundai. We deliberately chose China because this region is an important locations, as well as China’s consumers,” said Chung Euisun , Vice Chairman of Hyundai Motor, as reported Autoevolution

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Maybach Models

Models

Pre-war

1919 Maybach W1: Test car based on a Mercedes chassis
1921 Maybach W3: First Maybach, shown at Berlin Motor Show. Featured a 70?hp (52?kW) 5.7L inline six.

1926 Maybach W5: 7L inline six, 120?hp (89?kW)
1929 Maybach 12: V12 precursor to DS7/8
1930 Maybach DSH: Doppel-Sechs-Halbe (“half a twelve cylinder”) 1930-37
1930 Maybach DS7 Zeppelin: 7L V12, 150?hp (112?kW)
1931 Maybach W6: Same engine as W5, longer wheelbase. 1931-33
1931 Maybach DS8 Zeppelin: 8L V12, 200?hp (150?kW)
1934 Maybach W6 DSG: Featuring a twin overdrive transmission system.
1935 Maybach SW35: 3.5L 140?hp (104?kW) I6
1936 Maybach SW38: 3.8L 140?hp (104?kW) I6
1939 Maybach SW42: 4.2L 140?hp (104?kW) I6
1945 Maybach JW61: 3.8L 145?hp (108?kW) I6

W2 were the 5.7L inline six engines built for and ordered by Spyker. Not all were purchased, and Karl had to build cars featuring the engines to offset costs.

Around 1800 Maybachs were built before WW2. CHITHRA

Post-revival

Maybach Exelero at the Concours d’Elegance

2002 Maybach 57 and 62
2005 Maybach Exelero (prototype shown at the IAA in Frankfurt)
2005 Maybach 57S (the S standing for Special rather than Sport)
2006 Maybach 62S
2007 Maybach 62 Landaulet (prototype)

wikipedia

Jeep History

Origin of the term “jeep”
There are many explanations of the origin of the word “jeep”, which have proven difficult to verify. Probably the most popular notion holds that the vehicle bore the designation “GP” (for “Gov. Purposes” or “General Purpose”), which was phonetically slurred into the word jeep. However, R. Lee Ermey, on his television series Mail Call, disputes this, saying that the vehicle was designed for specific duties, was never referred to as “General Purpose”, and that the name may have been derived from Ford’s nomenclature referring to the vehicle as GP (G for government-use, and P to designate its 80-inch (2,000?mm) wheelbase). “GP” does appear in connection with the vehicle in the mode TM 9-803 manual, which describes the vehicle as a machine and the vehicle is designated a “GP” in TM 9-2800, Standard Motor Vehicles, September 1, 1949, but whether the average jeep-driving GI would have been familiar with either of these manuals is open to debate.

This account may confuse the jeep with the nickname of another series of vehicles with the GP designation. The Electro-Motive Division of General Motors, a maker of railroad locomotives, introduced its “General Purpose” line in 1949, using the GP tag. These locomotives are commonly referred to as Geeps, pronounced the same way as “Jeep.”

Many, including Ermey, suggest that soldiers at the time were so impressed with the new vehicles that they informally named it after Eugene the Jeep, a cartoon character that “could go anywhere”.

The term “jeep” was first commonly used during World War I (1914?1918) by soldiers as a slang word for new recruits and for new unproven vehicles. This is according to a history of the vehicle for an issue of the U.S. Army magazine, Quartermaster Review, which was written by Maj. E. P. Hogan. He went on to say that the slang word “jeep” had these definitions as late as the start of World War II.

“Jeep” had been used as the name of a small tractor made by Moline.

The term “jeep” would eventually be used as slang to refer to an airplane, a tractor used for hauling heavy equipment, and an autogyro. When the first models of the jeep came to Camp Holabird for tests, the vehicle did not have a name yet. Therefore the soldiers on the test project called it a jeep. Civilian engineers and test drivers who were at the camp during this time were not aware of the military slang term. They most likely were familiar with the character Eugene the Jeep and thought that Eugene was the origin of the name. The vehicle had many other nicknames at this time such as Peep (the term originally used in the Armored Force), Pygmy, and Blitz-Buggy, although because of the Eugene association, Jeep stuck in people’s minds better than any other term.

Words of the Fighting Forces by Clinton A. Sanders, a dictionary of military slang, published in 1942, in the library at The Pentagon gives this definition:

Jeep: A four-wheel drive car of one-half to one-and-one-half ton capacity for reconnaissance or other army duty. A term applied to the bantam-cars, and occasionally to other motor vehicles (U.S.A.) in the Air Corps, the Link Trainer; in the armored forces, the ? ton command car. Also referred to as “any small plane, helicopter, or gadget.” Early in 1941, Willys-Overland demonstrated the vehicle’s ability by having it drive up the U.S. Capitol steps, driven by Willy’s test driver Irving “Red” Haussman, who had recently heard soldiers at Fort Holabird calling it a “jeep.” When asked by syndicated columnist Katherine Hillyer for the Washington Daily News (or by a bystander, according to another account) what it was called, Irving answered, “It’s a jeep.”

Katherine Hillyer’s article was published on February 20, 1941 around the nation and included a picture of the vehicle with the caption:

LAWMAKERS TAKE A RIDE- With Senator Meade, of New York, at the wheel, and Representative Thomas, of New Jersey, sitting beside him, one of the Army’s new scout cars, known as “jeeps” or “quads”, climbs up the Capitol steps in a demonstration yesterday. Soldiers in the rear seat for gunners were unperturbed. This exposure caused all other jeep references to fade, leaving the 4×4 truck with the name.

Willys-Overland Inc. was later awarded the sole privilege of owning the name “Jeep” as registered trademark, by extension, merely because it originally had offered the most powerful engine.

wikipedia

Mercedes-Benz Car nomenclature

Car nomenclature
In 1994 (starting with the 1994 models), the traditional nomenclature of Mercedes-Benz vehicles changed. Since the early days of the company the name would be in the form of 500E where the engine displacement made up the first three numbers and the last letter(s) represented the type of engine and/or chassis; for example: “E” for fuel injection (“Einspritzung” in German), “D” for Diesel, “L” for long wheelbase etc.

In 1994, this was altered so that the prefix reflected the model (“class”, German “Klasse”, in Mercedes-Benz terminology) and a number the displacement. The suffix was retained in some cases, for example “L” for long wheelbase, and “CDI” for Diesel (CDI = Common rail Direct Injection). Thus, the 500E in the example above became the E500 (“E-Klasse”, 5 liters displacement). It should also be noted that while in the past the model number generally accurately reflected the actual engine displacement, this is currently not always the case – for example the E200 CDI and E220 CDI actually both have a 2.2 liter/litre displacement, and the C240 actually has a 2.6 liter/litre engine.

BlueHYBRID is used for hybrid electric vehicles

Rolls-Royce Silver Ghost

The Rolls-Royce Silver Ghost refers both to a car model and to one specific car from that series.

Originally named the “40/50 h.p.” the chassis was originally produced at Royce’s Manchester works moving to Derby in July 1908 and between 1921 and 1926 at Springfield, Massachusetts factories. Chassis no. 60551, registered AX 201, was the car that was originally given the name “Silver Ghost.” Other 40/50 hp cars were also given names but the Silver Ghost title was taken up by the press and soon all 40/50s were called by the name, a fact not officially recognised by Rolls-Royce until 1925 when the Phantom range was launched.

The Silver Ghost was the origin of Rolls-Royce’s claim of making the “Best car in the world” ? a phrase coined not by themselves, but by the prestigious publication Autocar in 1907.

The chassis and engine were also used as the basis of a range of Rolls-Royce Armoured Cars.

Manufacturer
Rolls-Royce Ltd

Also called
40/50

Production
1906?1926
7874 made

Predecessor
Rolls-Royce 30 hp

Successor
Phantom I

Engine(s)
straight 6
7036cc (1906-1910)
7428cc (from 1910)

Transmission(s)
4 speed manual (1906-1913)
3 speed manual (1909-1913)

Wheelbase
135.5 in (3442 mm) (until 1913)
143.5 in (3645 mm) (1913-1923)
144 in (3658 mm) and 150.5 in (3823 mm) (from 1923)

Rolls-Royce V-8 (1905)

The Rolls-Royce V-8 was a car produced by Rolls-Royce in 1905 intended to compete with the then popular electric cars used in towns.

Claude Johnson, business partner of C. S. Rolls suggested there would be a market for an internal combustion engined car that could take on the electric car market. To do this it would have to be silent, free of vibration and smoke free. The engine would also have to be mounted under the car to give the appearance of a town brougham and so needed to be very shallow. To do this Henry Royce designed a completely new engine in the form of a 90 degree, side valve, 3,535 cc (215.7 cu in), V-8. To reduce fumes the then common drip lubrication was replaced by a pressure system. The power also seems to have been limited to maximise smooth running.

Two body styles were proposed, a Landaulet par Excellence to attack the town electric market and the Legalimit which was governed so as not to allow the then United Kingdom speed limit of 20 mph (32 km/h) to be exceeded. The Legalimit had the engine conventionally mounted at the front but under a very low bonnet. Only one example of the V-8 was sold, a Legalimit (chassis number 40518) to Sir Alfred Hamsworth. This was later taken back by the factory. All three cars then seem to have been used as works cars or for customer visits. Rolls ordered three more chassis for delivery in 1906 but there is no evidence these were ever made.

Although the car cannot be judged as being a success, lessons were learned from the engine design that were later used on the six cylinder models that made the Rolls-Royce name.

The V-8 is the only car model made by Rolls-Royce of which no example survives.

Manufacturer
Rolls-Royce Ltd

Production
1905
3 made

Engine(s)
3535 cc V-8

Transmission(s)
three speed

Wheelbase
Landaulette 90 inches (2286 mm)
Legalimit 106 inches (2692 mm)

Designer
Sir Henry Royce

Toyota Corolla E20

The Corolla E20 was the second generation of cars sold by Toyota under the Corolla nameplate.

The second-generation KE2# / TE2# model, launched 1970, had “coke-bottle” styling. It had a longer 91.9 in (2334 mm) wheelbase. The front suspension design was improved greatly, using a swaybar, however the rear remained relatively the same. The Corolla became the second-best selling car in the world that year. Grades for sedan were Standard, Deluxe, and Hi-Deluxe. The coup? was offered in Deluxe, SL, SR, and Levin as well as Sprinter variants. The Sprinter Trueno was equivalent to the Corolla Levin.

The TE27 Levin is featured in Auto Modellista, a racing video game by Capcom.

Minor changes were made for the 1973 model year with a new grille, turn signal lights, and tail lights, along with similar treatment to the Sprinter.

Japan (1970-1978)
Most models stopped production in July 1974 but the KE26 wagon and van were still marketed in Japan after the 30-series was introduced.

Japanese engines:

T ? 1.4 L (1407 cc) I4, 8-valve OHV, carb, 86 hp (63 kW)
T-D ? 1.4 L (1407 cc) I4, 8-valve OHV, carb, 90 hp (66 kW)
T-B ? 1.4 L (1407 cc) I4, 8-valve OHV, twin carb,
2T ? 1.6 L (1588 cc) I4, 8-valve OHV, carb, 75 hp (56 kW)
2T-B ? 1.6 L (1588 cc) I4, 8-valve OHV, twin carb
2T-G ? 1.6 L (1588 cc) I4, 8-valve DOHC, twin carb, 115 hp (86 kW)
3K ? 1.2 L (1166 cc) I4, 8-valve OHV, carb, 55 hp (41 kW)
3K-D ? 1.2 L (1166 cc) I4, 8-valve OHV, carb, 73 hp (54 kW)
3K-B ? 1.2 L (1166 cc) I4, 8-valve OHV, twin carb, 77 hp (57 kW)
JPN-market chassis:

KE20 ? 1166 cc Sedan, 2-door/4-door (Std, DX, Hi-DX)
TE20 ? 1407 cc Sedan, 2-door/4-door (Std, DX, Hi-DX)
KE25 ? 1166 cc Hardtop coup? (DX, Hi-DX, SL)
TE25 ? 1407 cc Hardtop coup? (DX, Hi-DX, SL, SR)
KE26 ? 1166 cc Wagon, 3-door/5-door
TE27 ? 1588 cc Hardtop Coup? (Levin/Trueno twincam)

USA (1970-1974)
The Japan chassis models were all available in USA. A 1.6 L (1588 cc/96 in?) 102 hp (76 kW) engine came in 1971, quite impressive for the time, and a sporty hardtop coup? called the SR5 (also known as the Levin in Japan) was introduced in 1973. In 1974, the SR5 was entered by Car & Driver magazine’s team in SCCA competition.

American engines:

2T-C ? 1.6 L (1588 cc) I4, 8-valve OHV, carb, 102 hp (76 kW)
3K-C ? 1.2 L (1166 cc) I4, 8-valve OHV, carb, 55 hp (41 kW)
US-market chassis: TE21 ? Sedan, 2-door/4-door (Std, DX, Hi-DX) TE26 ? Wagon, DX TE27 ? Hardtop coup? (SR5)

Production
1970-1978

Assembly
Toyota City, Japan
Port Melbourne, Victoria, Australia

Body style(s)
2-door coupe
4-door sedan
3-door station wagon
5-door station wagon
5-door van

Layout
FR layout

Engine(s)
1.2L I4
1.4L I4
1.6L I4

Wheelbase
91.9?in (2334?mm)

Toyota Corolla E10

The Corolla E10 was the first generation of cars sold by Toyota under the Corolla nameplate.

The Corolla was launched in Japan in October 1966. Eiji Toyoda said it worked hard to create popular demand, and disputes that Toyota rode a wave of private car ownership that was taking off in the mid-1960s. Its major competitor was the Datsun 1000, released a few months before the Corolla.

The initial car, the KE1x series was small, with a 90 in (2286 mm) wheelbase.

Transmission was by a 4-speed floor shift manual transmission or a 2-speed floor or column shift automatic transmission, with rear wheel drive. At the time, floor shift transmissions were considered only for trucks and 4 speeds implied that the engine did not have enough torque to drive through only 3 gears (more torque allows each gear to have a wider spread of engine revolutions, thus requiring fewer gears). This was a big risk for Toyota but the effectiveness of the new system gained in popularity.

The suspension in front was MacPherson struts supported by a transverse leaf spring beneath the engine cross-member, with leaf springs connected to a solid axle in back.

The engine was originally meant to be for the under 1000 cc tax class but was changed late in the design process to be 1077 cc in order to beat the forthcoming Datsun 1000. This put it into a higher tax class but this gave it some prestige over the Datsun 1000 – helped by its “100 cc advantage” advertising campaign. In August 1969 the engine was upgraded to 1166 cc. Special twin carburettor K-B (1077 cc) and 3K-B (1166 cc) engines were used in the SL grade models for an extra 13 hp (9.7 kW).

The Corolla E10 was sold from November 1966 to April 1970.

Japan
Japanese market engines:

K ? 1.1 L (1077 cc) I4, 8-valve OHV, carb, 60 hp (44 kW)
K-B ? 1.1 L (1077 cc) I4, 8-valve OHV, twin carb, 73 hp (54 kW)
3K ? 1.2 L (1166 cc) I4, 8-valve OHV, carb, 65 hp (48 kW)
3K-B ? 1.2 L (1166 cc) I4, 8-valve OHV, twin carb
Japanese market chassis:

E-10 ? 1077 cc Sedan (2-door/4-door)
E-15 ? 1077 cc Hardtop coup?
E-16 ? 1077 cc Wagon, 2-door
E-11 ? 1166 cc Sedan (2-door/4-door)
E-17 ? 1166 cc Hardtop coup?
E-18 ? 1166 cc Wagon, 2-door

North America
Toyota has been almost steadfast in facelifting each generation after two years, and replacing it with an all-new model every four years. Exports to the United States began in March 1968 at about US$1,700.

North American market engines:

K ? 1.1 L (1077 cc) I4, 8-valve OHV, carb, 60 hp (44 kW)
3K ? 1.2 L (1166 cc) I4, 8-valve OHV, carb, 65 hp (48 kW)
North American market chassis:

E-10 ? 1077 cc Sedan (2-door/4-door)
E-15 ? 1077 cc Hardtop coup?
E-16 ? 1077 cc Wagon, 2-door
E-11 ? 1166 cc Sedan (2-door/4-door)
E-17 ? 1166 cc Hardtop coup?
E-18 ? 1166 cc Wagon, 2-door

Australia
The first export market for the Corolla was Australia in November 1966. Australia received right hand drive versions of the same models as America.

?

Production
1966-1970

Assembly
Toyota City, Japan
Port Melbourne, Victoria, Australia

Body style(s)
2-door coupe
4-door sedan
4-door station wagon

Layout
FR layout

Engine(s)
1.1L I4
1.2L I4

Transmission(s)
4-speed manual
2-speed automatic

Wheelbase
90.0?in (2286?mm)

Wikipedia

Toyota AE

The AE sedan was a smaller car than its predecessors.

Dates and Production Figures
The AE was developed in 1939 and introduced at the beginning of 1940, with a prototype being completed at this time. However, production occurred from 1941 to 1943. Only 76 of this model were built.

Mechanicals
The mechanicals were similar to the AA except that it had the Type C engine, which was a Type A with 2 cylinders removed.

?

Manufacturer
Toyota

Production
1941 to 1943

Predecessor
AA, AB

Successor
AC

Class
medium size family car

Body style(s)
sedan

Layout
front-engine, rear-wheel drive

Platform
ladder chassis

Engine(s)
Type C

Transmission(s)
3 speed floor shift manual

Wheelbase
2500?mm (98.4?in)

Length
4500?mm (177.2?in)

Width
1730?mm (68.1?in)

Height
1635?mm (64.4?in)

Curb weight
1220?kg (2689.6?lb)

Toyota EA

Kiichiro Toyoda designed the EA as a copy of the DKW F-7 sedan in 1938 but production was prevented by war time restrictions.

Dates and Production Figures
The EA was designed in 1938 but did not go into production.

Mechanicals
A small front mounted, 2 cylinder, 2 stroke Type E engine connected as front wheel drive.

?

Manufacturer
Toyota

Production
1938 (prototypes)

Assembly
Koromo, Japan

Class
small family car

Body style(s)
sedan

Layout
front-engine, front-wheel drive

Engine(s)
Type E

Wheelbase
2610 mm

Length
3220 mm

Width
1300 mm

Height
1250 mm

Curb weight
650 kg

Related
DKW F-7